A defibrillator (AED) has been installed on the newly refurbished toilets at the top of Crown Hill.

What is an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)?

 

A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart of someone who is in cardiac arrest. This high energy shock is called defibrillation, and it's an essential part in trying to save the life of someone who’s in cardiac arrest.

 

4 steps to take if someone is having a cardiac arrest.

Cardiac arrests can happen to anyone, at any time. The following steps give someone the best chance of survival. If you come across someone in cardiac arrest:

 

  1. Call 999

  2. Start CPR

  3. Ask someone to bring a defibrillator if there’s one nearby

  4. Turn on the defibrillator and follow its instructions.

 

Who can use a defibrillator?

You don’t need to be trained to use a defibrillator – anyone can use it. There are clear instructions on how to attach the defibrillator pads. It then assesses the heart rhythm and will only instruct you to deliver a shock if it’s needed. You cannot deliver a shock accidentally, the defibrillator will only allow you to shock if it is needed.

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of premature death, but with immediate treatment many lives can be saved. SCA occurs because the electrical rhythm that controls the heart is replaced by a chaotic disorganised electrical rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF).

 

Many SCA victims can be saved if persons nearby recognise what has happened, summon the ambulance service with the minimum of delay, perform basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (particularly chest compressions) and use an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) to provide a high energy electric shock to restore the heart’s normal rhythm. Each of these stages is a link in a chain of events that provide the best chance of success, but the critical factor is the speed with which the shock is given.  

 

AEDs are easy to use, compact, portable and very effective. They are designed to be used by lay persons; the machines guide the operator through the process by verbal instructions and visual prompts. They are safe and will not allow a shock to be given unless the heart’s rhythm requires it. They are designed to be stored for long periods without use and require very little routine maintenance.

 

Note:

In the United Kingdom, there are very few legal barriers to PAD. A rescuer who has acted appropriately to help a victim of SCA should not be sued regardless of the outcome. 

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