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Majority of UK Tech Start-Ups Invest in Skills to Bridge Industry Gaps

UK tech start-ups are investing in skill development to tackle the growing skills gap in the sector. The Department for Education found that almost half of start-ups in the tech industry face difficulties in hiring staff with the right skills. This is a common concern for small businesses, which struggle to compete with larger tech companies like Amazon and Google for the best talent.

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Tech Start-Ups Invest in Skills to Bridge Industry Gaps

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Start-ups must find innovative ways to attract talent, such as offering equity in the company, to compete with larger tech companies.

UK tech start-ups are investing in skill development to tackle the growing skills gap in the sector. The Department for Education found that almost half of start-ups in the tech industry face difficulties in hiring staff with the right skills. This is a common concern for small businesses, which struggle to compete with larger tech companies like Amazon and Google for the best talent.


To tackle this problem, start-ups are focusing on investing in skill development. The Department for Education is presenting its Join the Skills Revolution campaign, which includes a skills and recruitment barometer report on small and medium-sized enterprises across England. Start-ups are also looking to hire from the pool of staff recently laid off by bigger tech companies. In some cases, company leaders are offering tech talent equity in the company to attract them.


Another challenge facing UK tech start-ups is the reduction of R&D tax credits for companies that spend less than 40% on innovation, announced in the recent Budget. This is said to potentially leave companies with smaller hiring and recruitment budgets. The issue is compounded by high-calibre tech talent asking for six-figure salaries, despite the average salary of a UK computer programmer being over £41,000.


Clare Walsh, director of education at the Institute of Analytics, believes the skills gap is a result of technological change happening too fast for education to keep up. She suggests that retraining and re-skilling staff to do a specific job is necessary.


The skills shortage is a growing concern for tech sector C-suites, according to a Fujitsu study. 45% of UK companies surveyed expressed a belief that their teams were not equipped to utilise advanced technology, while 38% said it was a key barrier to unlocking innovation.


In conclusion, the skills gap is a significant challenge facing UK tech start-ups. Investment in skill development is necessary to tackle this problem, but it’s not the only solution. Start-ups must also find innovative ways to attract talent, such as offering equity in the company, to compete with larger tech companies. Additionally, government policies, such as the reduction of R&D tax credits, must be carefully considered to avoid exacerbating the issue.

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